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In the News

Bladder Cancer
Immunotherapy

Early Data Show Activity for Enfortumab Vedotin Plus Pembrolizumab in Advanced Bladder Cancer

Alice Goodman  /  March 25, 2020

It may be possible to use a platinum-free combination as first-line treatment for advanced or metastatic urothelial carcinoma in cisplatin-ineligible patients, if results of the phase Ib/II EV-103 trial hold up. The combination of the newly approved antibody-drug conjugate (enfortumab vedotin) and a...

Prostate Cancer
Issues in Oncology

New PSA Recommendations: The Debate over Prostate Cancer Screening Continues

Ronald Piana  /  July 1, 2012

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recently issued a recommendation statement advising against the use of prostate-specific antigen (PSA)-based testing for prostate cancer,1 leaving many in the oncology community concerned that decades of clinical progress will be stalled, and setting ...

COVID-19

Mitigating the Spread of COVID-19 and Its Impact on Cancer

Jo Cavallo  /  April 10, 2020

On March 11, the World Health Organization (WHO) took the step it had been avoiding for weeks and declared that the spread of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), and the virus that causes it, now identified as SARS-CoV-2, had reached global pandemic levels, the first pandemic sparked by a coron...

Breast Cancer

Breast Reconstruction: ‘A Process Not a Procedure’ With Potential Short- and Long-Term Complications

Charlotte Bath  /  August 25, 2018

The complication rate among women who underwent postmastectomy breast reconstruction was 32.9% at 2 years postoperatively, and women undergoing autologous reconstruction “had significantly higher odds of developing any complication compared with those undergoing expander-implant reconstruction,” a...

MMRF Announces Enrollment Completion of CoMMpass Study

The ASCO Post  /  October 10, 2015

The Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation (MMRF) announced that the MMRF CoMMpass StudySM, the most comprehensive long-term genomic study ever conducted in myeloma, has reached full enrollment, with 1,000 patients now participating. The global study is mapping the genomic profile of each enrolled pat...

Supportive Care

Adolescent and Young Adult Patients Report Unmet Needs for Cancer Information and Psychosocial Support Services

Charlotte Bath  /  September 1, 2012

In the News focuses on media reports that your patients may have questions about at their next visit. This continuing column will provide summaries of articles in the popular press that may prompt such questions, as well as comments from colleagues in the field. Psychosocial care needs are not bein...

Breast Cancer

Too Soon to Know How Circulating Tumor Cells Might Be Used to Guide Treatment of Breast Cancer

Charlotte Bath  /  July 1, 2012

In the News focuses on media reports that your patients may have questions about at their next visit. This continuing column will provide summaries of articles in the popular press that may prompt such questions, as well as comments from colleagues in the field. “A simple blood test.” These were th...

Gynecologic Cancers
Issues in Oncology

New Guidelines Recommend Less Frequent Screening for Cervical Cancer, but That Doesn’t Mean Screening Is Less Important

Charlotte Bath  /  May 1, 2012

In the News focuses on media reports that your patients may have questions about at their next visit. This continuing column will provide summaries of articles in the popular press that may prompt such questions, as well as comments from colleagues in the field. In March 2012, the U.S. Preventive S...

Breast Cancer

Many Women Treated for High-risk Breast Cancer Do Not Receive Recommended Postmastectomy Radiation Therapy

Charlotte Bath  /  September 15, 2011

Despite major studies showing that postmastectomy radiation therapy improves survival for women with high-risk breast cancer and evidence-based guidelines supporting the use of postmastectomy radiotherapy, 45% of these patients do not receive such treatment, according to an analysis of data from mor...

Health-Care Policy

American Association for Cancer Research Mourns the Loss of Senator Arlen Specter

The ASCO Post  /  November 1, 2012

The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) mourns the loss of Arlen Specter, who represented Pennsylvania in the U.S. Senate from 1981 to 2011. With his passing, the cancer research and biomedical science community lost one of its greatest supporters and promoters. During his five terms an...

Breast Cancer

Benefits of Radiation after Breast-conserving Surgery Cut Risk of Recurrence in Half

Charlotte Bath  /  January 1, 2012

In the News focuses on media reports that your patients may have questions about at their next visit. This continuing column will provide summaries of articles in the popular press that may prompt such questions, as well as comments from colleagues in the field. “After breast-conserving surgery, ra...

Prostate Cancer

Optimizing Treatment for Advanced Prostate Cancer Requires Shifting Focus from Individual Drugs to Integrated Therapies

Charlotte Bath  /  August 15, 2011

Newer drugs, including sipuleucel-T (Provenge), cabazitaxel (Jevtana), and abiraterone (Zytiga), can extend survival modestly and ease symptoms for men with advanced prostate cancer. Maximizing the benefit to patients will require shifting the focus from developing individual drugs to developing int...

Breast Cancer

Reexcision Rates Following Breast-conservation Surgery Vary Widely

Charlotte Bath  /  March 1, 2012

In the News focuses on media reports that your patients may have questions about at their next visit. This continuing column will provide summaries of articles in the popular press that may prompt such questions, as well as comments from colleagues in the field. Reexcision rates for women with inva...

Prostate Cancer

Physicians Can Help Patients Set Realistic Expectations for Sexual Functioning after Treatment for Prostate Cancer

Charlotte Bath  /  November 1, 2011

Models that can be personalized to predict erectile function of individual patients following treatment for early-stage prostate cancer have been developed and validated in a study involving a total of 2,940 men, and are ready for use in clinical practice, according to Martin G. Sanda, MD, the study...

Breast Cancer

Increase in Advanced Breast Cancer among Younger Women Is Small but Significant, and Trend Is Likely to Continue 

Charlotte Bath  /  May 1, 2013

The incidence of advanced breast cancer among women aged 25 to 39 years increased by an average of 2.07% per year from 1976 to 2009 and the trend seems likely to continue, according to an analysis of data for 936,497 women diagnosed with malignant breast cancer. The small but statistically significa...

Colorectal Cancer

‘Hot Chemotherapy’ Generates Heated Debate about Its Use with Cytoreductive Surgery to Manage Peritoneal Metastases

Charlotte Bath  /  October 15, 2011

"Hot chemotherapy” has become the common term for hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC), which together with cytoreductive surgery is being used by some surgeons to treat patients with carcinomatosis from colorectal cancer. While HIPEC is not considered the most important component of th...

Gynecologic Cancers

Cervical Cancer Screening Study Should Reassure Physicians and Patients that a 3-Year Screening Interval Is Safe and Effective

Charlotte Bath  /  July 15, 2011

Results of a large-scale cervical cancer screening study using concurrent human papillomavirus (HPV) and Pap testing should “reassure” women over 30 who test negative for HPV and have normal Pap tests that “it is extremely safe to go 3 years” before being tested again, Barnett S. Kramer, MD, MPH, sa...

Supportive Care

Are Your Patients Using Complementary and Alternative Therapies? You Might Not Know If You Don’t Ask

Charlotte Bath  /  June 25, 2019

Nearly one-third of patients with cancer who reported that they used complementary and alternative therapies in a nationwide survey did not tell their physicians about the use of those therapies, and the most frequently cited reason for not telling their physicians was that their physicians did no...

Supportive Care

Cancer Patients Are at Increased Risk of Complications From the Flu and Should Receive Flu Shots, but Not the Nasal Spray

Charlotte Bath  /  February 1, 2014

Widespread influenza activity continues to be reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), with a recent increase in flu-related hospitalizations.1,2 Patients with cancer are at increased risk from flu complications and should receive the flu shot, but not the flu nasal spray va...

Breast Cancer

Increased Risk of Bone Loss Extends to Younger Women Treated for Breast Cancer

Charlotte Bath  /  February 25, 2019

Younger women who have been treated for breast cancer have a higher risk for osteopenia and osteoporosis than do their cancer-free peers, and that risk seems to rise when treatment involves chemotherapy plus hormone therapy or aromatase inhibitors alone. Researchers from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg Scho...

Gynecologic Cancers

Hormone Replacement and Ovarian Cancer: Competing Risks in Decisions about Bilateral Salpingo-oophorectomy

Charlotte Bath  /  June 15, 2011

Recently reported findings that bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and hysterectomy decreased the risk of ovarian cancer compared to ovarian conservation and hysterectomy, without increasing cardiovascular, fracture, and other cancer risks, should “challenge” current thinking about bilateral salpingo-o...

Gastrointestinal Cancer
Colorectal Cancer
Issues in Oncology

Increased Recognition of Colorectal Cancer in Young Adults, Even Those Aged 20 to 29, as Evidence Continues to Accumulate

Charlotte Bath  /  April 10, 2017

The incidence of colorectal cancer continues to increase among young adults, with the sharpest increase among those aged 20 to 29, according to a recent article in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.1 This trend has been called disturbing and ominous, but the widely reported results of thi...

Supportive Care

Depression Is Dangerous among Patients with Cancer, but Talking and Pharmacologic Treatments Can Be Effective

Charlotte Bath  /  February 15, 2012

In the News focuses on media reports that your patients may have questions about at their next visit. This continuing column will provide summaries of articles in the popular press that may prompt such questions, as well as comments from colleagues in the field. “Depression is a very dangerous prob...

SIDEBAR: Expect Questions from Your Patients and Colleagues

Charlotte Bath  /  June 15, 2011

Patients of the Women’s Cancer Center at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia often ask about ovarian cancer risk, the center’s Director, Robert A. Burger, MD, told The ASCO Post. Moreover, the recent study showing that bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy reduced that risk generated discussion among ...

Colorectal Cancer

Expect Questions About Colorectal Cancer Among Younger Adults

Charlotte Bath  /  April 10, 2017

Publicity surrounding a recent study showing a sharp increase in colorectal cancer among young people, even those in their 20s,1 may result in increased patient visits and questions. Among people aged 20 to 39, colon cancer rates have increased 1% to 2.4%, and rectal cancer rates have increased 3....

Geriatric Oncology
Issues in Oncology

‘Slow, Incremental Changes’ Are Increasing Participation of Older Adults in Clinical Trials

Charlotte Bath  /  August 25, 2017

Older adults continue to be proportionally underrepresented in oncology clinical trials, but the participation rate of adults aged 65 and older is increasing by “slow, incremental changes,” Stuart M. Lichtman, MD, FACP, FASCO, noted in an interview with The ASCO Post. Prompting those changes are the...

Supportive Care
Pain Management

Pain Remains Prevalent among Oncology Outpatients, with Odds of Undertreatment Twice as High among Minority Patients

Charlotte Bath  /  November 1, 2012

In 1994, a landmark study of pain among oncology outpatients prompted a host of pain management initiatives.1 More than 18 years later, a recent study among more than 2,000 cancer outpatients has found that “one-third of the patients who had pain or used analgesics received inadequate treatment for ...

Breast Cancer
Integrative Oncology

ASCO Endorses Guidelines for Integrative Therapies During and After Breast Cancer Treatment

Charlotte Bath  /  July 25, 2018

RECOMMENDATIONS IN the Society for Integrative Oncology (SIO) clinical practice guidelines for integrative therapies during and after breast cancer treatment “are clear, thorough, and based on the most relevant scientific evidence,” concluded an ASCO expert panel that reviewed the guidelines.1,2 ASC...

Gastrointestinal Cancer

‘Red-Flag’ Symptoms That Could Signal Colorectal Cancer in Patients Under 50 Years Old Should Be Taken Seriously

Charlotte Bath  /  March 10, 2016

In clinical practice, Samantha Hendren, MD, MPH, has been “shocked by what a large proportion of patients we are seeing who are under 50 and presenting with colorectal cancer,” often with advanced disease due to delayed diagnosis. “And that is because patients and physicians don’t even think of colo...

Issues in Oncology

Agreement on High-Value Screening for Five Common Cancers

Charlotte Bath  /  July 10, 2015

Finding agreement on high-value cancer screening among organizations publishing screening guidelines, the American College of Physicians (ACP) issued advice listing the least-intensive screening strategies that all the organizations recommend—as well as strategies not recommended—for five common can...

Supportive Care
Pain Management

SIDEBAR: Don’t Expect Direct Questions from Patients about Pain

Charlotte Bath  /  November 1, 2012

Just asking patients “Is there something else you want to address in the visit,” rather than “Is there anything else you want to address in the visit today,” dramatically reduced patients’ unmet concerns during a primary care visit, according to a 2007 study.1 That learning can be applied to talking...

Breast Cancer
Genomics/Genetics

Mutations in Five Genes Linked to Higher Lifetime Risks for Aggressive Breast Cancer

Charlotte Bath  /  September 25, 2018

USING MULTIGENE hereditary cancer panels to test for mutations in five genes can identify women at high risk for triple-negative breast cancer who may then benefit from more frequent screening, risk management, and potentially targeted therapies as well. A study that looked at multigene panel testin...

Integrative Oncology
Breast Cancer

Be Prepared to Answer—and Ask—Questions About Integrative Therapy

Charlotte Bath  /  July 25, 2018

ASCO HAS ENDORSED the recommendations in the Society for Integrative Oncology (SIO) clinical practice guidelines for integrative therapies during and after breast cancer.1,2 The guidelines “are clear, thorough, and based on the most relevant scientific evidence,” wrote the ASCO expert panel that rev...

Issues in Oncology
Solid Tumors
Hematologic Malignancies

Solid Organ Transplant Recipients Have Increased Risk for Broad Range of Malignancies

Charlotte Bath  /  December 15, 2011

In the News focuses on media reports that your patients may have questions about at their next visit. This continuing column will provide summaries of articles in the popular press that may prompt such questions, as well as comments from colleagues in the field. The Transplant Cancer Match Study, a...

Breast Cancer
Genomics/Genetics

Expect Questions About Genetic Testing for Breast Cancer

Charlotte Bath  /  September 25, 2018

A STUDY finding that pathogenic variants in 5 genes are associated with a high risk of triple-negative breast cancer and a 20% lifetime risk for overall breast cancer1 may increase interest in genetic testing. “This is the first study to establish which genes are associated with high lifetime risks ...

Leukemia

CT Scans in Childhood Can Triple Risk of Leukemia and Brain Cancer Later in Life, Study Finds

Charlotte Bath  /  September 15, 2012

In the News focuses on media reports that your patients may have questions about at their next visit. This continuing column will provide summaries of articles in the popular press that may prompt such questions, as well as comments from colleagues in the field. Computed tomography scans with cumul...

Breast Cancer
Issues in Oncology

Addressing the Needs of Transgender Patients for Breast Cancer Screening in Comfortable and Inclusive Environments

Charlotte Bath  /  March 25, 2020

An analysis of breast imaging center websites and a literature search for research articles on transgender breast health found that “issues related to transgender breast imaging are not well addressed in the radiology literature or in the radiology community, even though more transgender patients ar...

Solid Tumors
Breast Cancer

Dispel Fears About Breast Cancer Radiotherapy With ‘Real Truth’ About Modern Techniques and Side Effects

Charlotte Bath  /  May 10, 2018

Nearly 85% of patients surveyed 6 or more months after completing radiotherapy as part of their treatment for breast cancer reported the side effects were not as bad as they had feared or expected. Approximately 92% of the 269 patients treated with breast conservation and 81% of the 58 patients ...

Issues in Oncology

Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer: A Distinct Population of Patients Who Need to Be Treated Differently

Charlotte Bath  /  March 15, 2012

In the News focuses on media reports that your patients may have questions about at their next visit. This continuing column will provide summaries of articles in the popular press that may prompt such questions, as well as comments from colleagues in the field. Cancer among adolescents and young a...

Supportive Care

Outpatients Need to Be Aware of High Risk of Developing Venous Thromboembolism

Charlotte Bath  /  January 15, 2012

Most patients who develop venous thromboembolisms (VTE) while being treated for cancer, do so as outpatients, according to results of a retrospective, observational study comparing the incidence of VTE among inpatients and outpatients with cancer. Yet many outpatients do not even realize that they a...

Breast Cancer
Issues in Oncology

Don’t Expect Transgender Patients to ‘Out’ Themselves

Charlotte Bath  /  March 25, 2020

Although more transgender patients are presenting to breast centers for imaging, many “report significant social stigma when seeking care,” according to a study in the Journal of Breast Imaging.1 Reported verbal abuse and other forms of harassment “can lead to transgender patients concealing their g...

Symptom Management

Scalp Cooling Caps Offer Option to Prevent Hair Loss During Chemotherapy

Charlotte Bath  /  April 25, 2015

Hair loss remains one of the most dreaded side effects of chemotherapy, particularly for women. Scalp cooling caps worn by patients during chemotherapy infusion and for brief periods of time before and after offer these patients an option to preserve 50% or more of the hair on their heads. Although ...

Prostate Cancer

Active Surveillance of Very Low-Risk Prostate Cancer Might Not Be Suitable Option for African American Men 

Charlotte Bath  /  September 1, 2013

African American men with prostate cancer that meets current criteria for very low-risk disease might actually be harboring larger and more aggressive tumors that make active surveillance a less viable option, according to the results of a study published online in the Journal of Clinical Oncology1 ...

Issues in Oncology

Rising Rates of Six Obesity-Related Cancers Among Younger Adults

Charlotte Bath  /  April 25, 2019

PHYSICIANS SHOULD routinely assess the body mass index (BMI) of their patients and offer counseling and/or referrals to a nutritionist or dietician to patients with a BMI of > 30 kg/m2, Ahmedin Jemal, DVM, PhD, told The ASCO Post. Those actions plus community-level policies designed to increase o...

Issues in Oncology

Failure of Updated Dietary Guidelines to Advise Limiting Red and Processed Meat Deemed a ‘Missed Opportunity’

Charlotte Bath  /  February 25, 2016

“A missed opportunity” is how Susan Higginbotham, PhD, RD, Vice President for Research, American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR), described the “failure” of updated dietary guidelines to recommend limiting consumption of red and processed meat. Doing so would have “the potential to save thousan...

Breast Cancer

Varied Reactions to Study Finding That Preventing Ipsilateral Recurrence Did Not Prevent Death From Breast Cancer

Charlotte Bath  /  October 10, 2015

Women diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ have a low risk of dying of breast cancer, according to an observational study looking at data from 108,196 women diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ between 1988 and 2011.1 The breast cancer–specific mortality rate for these women was 1.1% at 10 yea...

Breast Cancer

'Practice-changing' ATLAS Study Supports 10 vs 5 Years of Tamoxifen Therapy in Women with Breast Cancer

Charlotte Bath  /  February 1, 2013

"Practice-changing" is the term several physicians and researchers used when asked by the media to describe the results of a study showing that extending tamoxifen therapy from 5 to 10 years for women with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer further reduced recurrence and mortality. Result...

Breast Cancer

Will Study Showing Increased Complications Compared to Whole-breast Irradiation Put the Brakes on Brachytherapy?

Charlotte Bath  /  June 15, 2012

In the News focuses on media reports that your patients may have questions about at their next visit. This continuing column will provide summaries of articles in the popular press that may prompt such questions, as well as comments from colleagues in the field. Older women treated for invasive bre...

Breast Cancer

Challenging Perceptions about Treatment Options for Younger Women with Early-stage Breast Cancer

Charlotte Bath  /  November 15, 2011

In the News focuses on media reports that your patients may have questions about at their next visit. This continuing column will provide summaries of articles in the popular press that may prompt such questions, as well as comments from colleagues in the field. “There is a perception out there tha...

Issues in Oncology

Assess and Address Weight Issues to Curtail Rise in Obesity-Related Cancers

Charlotte Bath  /  April 25, 2019

THE RISK FOR developing several obesity-related cancers is rising more rapidly in people aged 25 to 49 than in those older than 50, with the magnitude of the rise steepest in the youngest age group, according to a study published in Lancet Public Health.1 In an interview with The ASCO Post, the stud...

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