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Marina C. Garassino, MD, on COVID-19 and Thoracic Malignancies: TERAVOLT Registry

Marina C. Garassino, MD, on COVID-19 and Thoracic Malignancies: TERAVOLT Registry

Is It Time to Add Checkpoint Inhibitors to the Treatment of Locally Advanced Lung Cancer?

Is It Time to Add Checkpoint Inhibitors to the Treatment of Locally Advanced Lung Cancer?

After more than 20 years of failed strategies to improve survival rates for locally advanced lung cancers, checkpoint inhibitors have revolutionized therapy, but prognoses still lag behind other tumor types. During the ASCO20 Virtual Education Program, Mark G. Kris, MD, FASCO, a thoracic medical oncologist at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and Professor of Medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, discussed the potential for adding immunotherapy to local therapies, weighed the benefits of neoadjuvant versus adjuvant chemotherapy, and urged his colleagues to reimagine care for localized lung cancers.

ORIENT-11 Trial Shows Sintilimab Plus Chemotherapy Improves Progression-Free Survival in Advanced NSCLC

The first-line setting for patients with locally advanced or metastatic non-squamous non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) now has become more complicated, according to data presented during the 2020 International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer’s World Conference on Lung Cancer Virtual Presidential Symposium.1

RET Inhibitor Selpercatinib Achieves Durable Responses in Majority of Patients With RET Gene Fusions

For patients with RET fusion–positive non–small cell lung cancer, the targeted therapy selpercatinib was well tolerated and achieved durable objective responses in the majority of participants in the phase I/II LIBRETTO-001 trial. These findings were reported by Drilon et al in The New England Journal of Medicine.

Has Racial Disparity in Lung Cancer Incidence Lessened Among Young Adults?

A trend of higher lung cancer incidence rates in young Black people vs young White people in the United States has flipped, with the Black-White gap disappearing in men and reversing in women. The changing trends coincide with steeper declines in smoking among Black Americans, according to a new study published by Jemal et al in JNCI Cancer Spectrum.

Current Lung Cancer Screening Guidelines May Underselect Black Ever-Smokers

Current Lung Cancer Screening Guidelines May Underselect Black Ever-Smokers

Public health screening guidelines for lung cancer followed by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services undercount eligible Black individuals, according to a study by Mary Pasquinelli, DNP, FNP-BC, and colleagues in press at the Journal of Thoracic Oncology. This may contribute to disparities in lung cancer screening and treatment.

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