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Robert W. Carlson, MD, and John A. Gentile, Jr, on Milestones of NCCN

2015 NCCN Annual Conference

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Robert W. Carlson, MD, Chief Executive Officer, National Comprehensive Cancer Network, and John A. Gentile, Jr, Chairman, Harborside Press, LLC, discuss the early days of NCCN, controversies that surrounded the first meeting, oncologists’ embrace of the guidelines, and how the organization has evolved over the past 20 years.



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