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Andrew J. Armstrong, MD, ScM, on New Treatment Options in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

2015 NCCN Annual Conference

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Andrew J. Armstrong, MD, ScM, of Duke Cancer Institute, discusses the recent practice-changing landmark studies that showed significant increases in survival for men with castration-resistant prostate cancer and led to updates in the NCCN Guidelines for this disease.



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