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Abdul Rahman Al Armashi, MD, on AML: Racial Disparities in Mortality Trends

2022 ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition

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Abdul Rahman Al Armashi, MD, of Seidman Cancer Center, Case Western University, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, discusses a retrospective analysis, using a CDC database, in one of the largest subgroup-based racial population studies analyzing mortality trends in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Between 2000 and 2019, AML mortality was the highest in Whites and the lowest in American Indians or Alaska Natives. The highest rate of increase in mortality was seen in Asians or Pacific Islanders. Dr. Al Armashi talks about the many variables that might contribute to these inequalities (Abstract 600).



Transcript

Disclaimer: This video transcript has not been proofread or edited and may contain errors.
AML is one of the most prevalent forms of acute leukemia. Despite treatment advances, the High V relative survivor rate still has an eerie percent. In the recent data published by the National Cancer Institute, the death threat didn't show any improvement from 1992 to 2020. We conducted a retrospective analysis evaluating the race-specific mortality trends in an old patient with AML in the United States, giving the vacuity of studies evaluating those disparities. We used the CDC Wonder database which contained national mortality and population data. Also, it includes the cause of death from all death certificates filed in the United States. Our population included all patients who died from AML. We also included all races and ethnic groups in the United States from 2000 to 2019. Age-adjusted mortality was calculated per 1 million per person stratified by race and standardized to the US census of 2000. In our study, we found that the age-adjusted mortality was increased equally in both white and black groups. Also, we found that the mortality trends increased dramatically in the Asian Pacific Islander Group by 25%. It decreased in the Native Americans by 29%. Also, we found that the mortality trends increased by 5% in Hispanics and 3% in non-Hispanic. To our knowledge, this is the largest real-world data study evaluating race and ethnicity specific mortality trends of AML. Multiple variables might contribute to those disparities, including genetics, risk factors, socioeconomic status, equal access to healthcare, and also a response to treatment. Further studies are needed to evaluate those factors and to develop a method to close this gap.

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