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breast cancer
genomics/genetics
survivorship

Impact of Pregnancy After Breast Cancer in Women With Deleterious Germline BRCA Mutations

In a retrospective cohort study reported in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, Matteo Lambertini, MD, PhD, and colleagues found that pregnancy after breast cancer in women harboring deleterious germline BRCA mutations did not appear to be associated with worsened maternal prognosis or fetal...

breast cancer
survivorship

Pregnancy Appears Safe After Treatment for Breast Cancer in Patients With BRCA Mutations

Pregnancy after breast cancer appears to be safe in patients with germline BRCA mutations—and particularly among those with BRCA1 mutations—according to new research. Limited data are available on the safety of pregnancy and reproductive outcomes in patients with breast cancer and BRCA mutations,...

Conquer Cancer Honors Oncology Professionals With Merit Awards at the 2019 ASCO Annual Meeting

Conquer Cancer®, the ASCO Foundation, is pleased to announce the recipients of its 2019 ASCO Annual Meeting Merit Awards. These distinguished awards support oncology trainees who were first authors on abstracts selected for presentation at the ASCO Annual Meeting. This year, Conquer Cancer...

breast cancer
immunotherapy

Hope S. Rugo, MD, and Matteo Lambertini, MD, PhD, on the SOPHIA Trial in HER2-Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer: Chemotherapy Plus Margetuximab vs Trastuzumab

Matteo Lambertini, MD, PhD, of the University of Genova and Policlinico San Martino Hospital, and Hope S. Rugo, MD, of the University of California, San Francisco, discuss findings from the SOPHIA trial on margetuximab plus chemotherapy vs trastuzumab plus chemotherapy in patients with...

breast cancer
survivorship

Matteo Lambertini, MD, PhD, on Safety of Pregnancy After Treatment for BRCA-Mutated Breast Cancer

Matteo Lambertini, MD, PhD, of the University of Genova and Policlinico San Martino Hospital, discusses data from an international cohort study on counseling women with breast cancer who have a BRCA mutation about the safety of becoming pregnant once they complete treatment (Abstract 11506).

breast cancer

ESMO Breast Cancer 2019: Outcomes in Younger Patients With Breast Cancer

Breast cancer in young women is characterized by more aggressive biologic features as compared to older patients, but outcomes are good when guideline-recommended treatments are given. European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) spokesperson Matteo Lambertini, MD, PhD, of IRCCS Policlinico San...

breast cancer

ESMO 2018: PALOMA-3: Palbociclib in Hormone Receptor–Positive, HER2-Negative Advanced Breast Cancer

Treatment with the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4/6 inhibitor palbociclib (Ibrance) achieved a clinically meaningful improvement in overall survival in patients with hormone receptor (HR)-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative advanced breast cancer that has relapsed or ...

ASCO Annual Meeting Merit Awards: This Year’s Winners

The Conquer Cancer Merit Awards support oncology trainees who are first authors on abstracts selected for presentation at an ASCO scientific meeting, including the ASCO Annual Meeting and thematic symposia. Conquer Cancer recognized 127 recipients with Merit Awards at the 2018 ASCO Annual Meeting,...

breast cancer

Effect of GnRHa Treatment During Chemotherapy on Preservation of Ovarian Function and Fertility in Premenopausal Patients With Early Breast Cancer

A meta-analysis of patient-level data reported by Lambertini et al in the Journal of Clinical Oncology indicated that temporary ovarian suppression with gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists (GnRHa) during chemotherapy was effective in preserving ovarian function and fertility in premenopausal...

solid tumors
breast cancer

Ovarian Function Suppression During and After Chemotherapy Valid for Some Patients With Early Breast Cancer

Temporary ovarian suppression during chemotherapy as a means of preserving ovarian function and fertility in young women with early breast cancer is controversial. An eagerly awaited meta-analysis including individual patient data from five randomized controlled trials found that the use of...

solid tumors
breast cancer

Combined Therapies Increase Adverse Events in Patients With Hormone Receptor–Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer

In patients with hormone receptor–positive metastatic breast cancer, the combination of targeted agents and hormone therapy is associated with a significantly increased risk of severe adverse events, according to research presented by Matteo Lambertini, MD, European Society for Medical Oncology...

breast cancer

Matteo Lambertini, MD, on Preserving Fertility in Patients With Early Breast Cancer: Pooled Analysis

Matteo Lambertini, MD, of the Institut Jules Bordet, discusses the results of five clinical trials investigating temporary ovarian suppression with gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs during chemotherapy as a strategy to preserve ovarian function and fertility in premenopausal early breast...

breast cancer

SABCS 2017: Temporary Ovarian Suppression With Hormone Analog May Preserve Fertility During Breast Cancer Chemotherapy

Meta-analysis of individual patient data from five randomized clinical trials provided a high level of evidence that treatment with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog (GnRHa) could safely and effectively protect ovarian function and potentially preserve fertility in premenopausal women...

breast cancer

Pregnancy After Breast Cancer

Findings from a retrospective study showed that women who became pregnant after an early breast cancer diagnosis, including those with estrogen receptor–positive tumors, did not have a higher chance of cancer recurrence and death than those who did not become pregnant.1 Matteo Lambertini, MD, of...

breast cancer
survivorship

Matteo Lambertini, MD, on Pregnancy in Breast Cancer Patients: Results From a Multicenter Study

Matteo Lambertini, MD, of the Institut Jules Bordet, discusses a long-term follow-up analysis of the safety of pregnancy in patients with a history of estrogen receptor–positive breast cancer. (Abstract LBA10066)

breast cancer
survivorship

ASCO 2017: Pregnancy After Breast Cancer Does Not Increase Chance of Recurrence

Findings from a retrospective study of 1,200 women provide reassurance to breast cancer survivors who are contemplating pregnancy. In the study, women who became pregnant after an early breast cancer diagnosis, including those with estrogen receptor–positive tumors, did not have a higher...

issues in oncology
breast cancer

Matteo Lambertini, MD, on Preserving Women’s Fertility Through Hormonal Therapy

Matteo Lambertini, MD, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, discusses the use of LHRH agonists during chemotherapy to suppress ovarian function as a way to preserve fertility in breast cancer patients (Abstract 1957).

breast cancer

Fertility Preservation Suggested With Triptorelin in Long-Term Study

Young women with early breast cancer may be more likely to resume menses and become pregnant when treated with a luteinizing hormone–releasing hormone (LH-RH) analog (also known as a gonadotropin-releasing hormone [GnRH] analog) along with chemotherapy, according to the final follow-up of...

breast cancer
issues in oncology

Ovarian Suppression During Chemotherapy Preserves Fertility in Young Women With Breast Cancer

Several studies have addressed the risks and benefits of ovarian suppression during chemotherapy for breast cancer in women of childbearing age. A new meta-analysis of randomized trials found that it prevented premature ovarian failure and was associated with a higher number of pregnancies post...

breast cancer
survivorship
issues in oncology

ECC 2015: Hormone Therapy May Prevent Ovarian Failure and Preserve Fertility in Women With Breast Cancer

Young women undergoing chemotherapy for breast cancer may be more likely to remain fertile if they also receive hormonal treatment, according to new research (Abstract 1957) presented at the 2015 European Cancer Congress in Vienna, Austria, and published simultaneously by Lambertini et al in Annals ...

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