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Maxwell Oluwole Akanbi, MD, PhD, on Lung Cancer: The Effect of Screening on the Incidence of Advanced Disease

2022 ASCO Annual Meeting

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Maxwell Oluwole Akanbi, MD, PhD, of McLaren Regional Medical Center, discusses the study he conducted, using the SEER database, to evaluate the impact of lung cancer screening recommendations on low-dose CT scanning. The data suggest that guidelines from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force led to a more rapid decline in the incidence of advanced disease in the United States, especially among minority populations (Abstract 10506).



Transcript

Disclaimer: This video transcript has not been proofread or edited and may contain errors.
Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality in the US, and this is because most patients with lung cancer are diagnosed at advanced stages of the disease. Trying to make patients present earlier has been an elusive challenge, until in 2011, when results of the National Lung Cancer Trial were reported. This study showed that low-dose CT scan could improve survival in patients with lung cancer by making earlier diagnosis. Although this has been shown in clinical trials, the government has ruled out lung cancer screening in the general population without also actually knowing whether it is efficacious in the general population. Our study was to evaluate the effectiveness of lung cancer screening in the US general population. You will use the SEER database, we analyzed data of patient diagnosed with lung cancer from 2004 to 2018. Our goal was to see if the incidence of advanced lung cancer reduced over this time. Our results showed that incidence of advanced lung cancer actually decreased in the US population following the rollout of lung cancer screening. This was particularly significant in minority populations. This is encouraging because there have been concerns that lung cancer screening may not be very effective in this population because they had limited access to screening facilities. So, while this is encouraging, the work is not yet done. Our end goal is to make sure there's reduction in lung cancer mortality. There are still barriers between screening and mortality, so the next stage of our study will be to see whether this reduction in incidence of advanced lung cancer actually translate to reduction in lung cancer mortality.

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