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Gwendolyn P. Quinn, PhD, on Underserved Cancer Patients and Survivors: Are We Listening to Them?

2017 Quality Care Symposium

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Gwendolyn P. Quinn, PhD, of Moffitt Cancer Center, discusses the challenges that minority, LGBTQ, low-literacy, and underserved populations face in getting their voices heard and what it will take to change that.



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