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William A. Hall, MD, on Prostate Cancer: Results From a Study of Three Treatment Modalities

2017 ASTRO Annual Meeting

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William A. Hall, MD, of the Medical College of Wisconsin, discusses trial findings on androgen deprivation and radiation alone, compared with androgen deprivation, radiotherapy, and surgery in men with high-risk, nonmetastatic adenocarcinoma of the prostate (Abstract 15).



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