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Magrolimab Plus Azacitidine in TP53-Mutant AML


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High-risk patients with TP53-mutated acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have limited treatment options and very poor prognoses. Magrolimab is a monoclonal antibody designed to block CD47, an immune macrophage checkpoint molecule that signals “don’t eat me,” thereby allowing leukemia cell destruction. Combining magrolimab with the hypomethylating agent azacitidine helped eliminate tumor cells by increasing the number of “eat me” signals in preclinical studies.

Naval Daver, MD

Naval Daver, MD

In a phase Ib trial presented by Naval Daver, MD, of the Department of Leukemia at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, and colleagues at the European Hematology Association (EHA) 2022 Congress (Abstract S132), researchers evaluated the safety, efficacy, and tolerability of this combination in 72 patients with newly diagnosed high-risk TP53-mutated AML.

The objective response rate was 48.6% and the complete response rate was 33.3%. Median time to objective response was 2.2 months; median complete response duration was 7.7 months; and median overall survival was 10.8 months. Common side effects included constipation, diarrhea, febrile neutropenia, nausea, and fatigue.

The findings suggest this combination has a favorable safety profile and encouraging early results. A phase III trial currently is underway to compare this treatment to the current standard of care therapies in newly diagnosed TP53-mutant AML.

Disclosure: For full disclosures of the study authors, visit library.ehaweb.org.

The content in this post has not been reviewed by the American Society of Clinical Oncology, Inc. (ASCO®) and does not necessarily reflect the ideas and opinions of ASCO®.
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