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Expert Point of View: Sophia C. Kamran, MD


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Sophia C. Kamran, MD

Sophia C. Kamran, MD

Sophia C. Kamran, MD, Assistant Professor of Radiation Oncology at Massachusetts General Hospital, commented on the NRG Oncology GU003 study at a press conference where this abstract was discussed. Dr. Kamran was not involved in this trial. “This is a potentially practice-changing study in an area of unmet need,” she said.

Dr. Kamran continued: “The investigators found no difference between hypofractionated and conventionally fractionated radiation therapy in the postprostatectomy setting in terms of genitourinary adverse events, as measured by patient-reported outcomes. In terms of gastrointestinal effects, there was an initial decrement for hypofractionation but no difference after 6 months. The field is moving toward hypofractionated radiation therapy for prostate cancer. The advantages are cost savings, time savings for patients, and better utilization of resources for radiation departments.”

Of note, Dr. Kamran mentioned that lymph node irradiation was not allowed in this trial. “We need to further understand how postprostatectomy lymph node irradiation would play a role in treatment selection [for hypofractionation] and how to select appropriate patients,” she said. 

DISCLOSURE: Dr. Kamran’s spouse is employed by Sanofi Genzyme.


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