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AAAS Announces Leading Scientists Elected as 2020 Fellows


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Nearly 500 members of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) have earned the lifetime distinction of AAAS Fellow. The Fellows are elected each year by their peers serving on the Council of AAAS, the organization’s member-run governing body. The title recognizes important contributions to the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics—including pioneering research, leadership within a given field, teaching and mentoring, fostering collaborations, and advancing public understanding of science.

A virtual induction ceremony for the 489 newly elected Fellows will take place on February 13, 2021, the Saturday following the AAAS Annual Meeting. The full roster of 2020 Fellows was published in the November 27, 2020, issue of Science; the following list highlights inductees from the oncology community:

  • Suresh K. Alahari, PhD, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center School of Medicine: For distinguished contributions in cancer research and teaching, with a focus on signal transduction
  • Swathi Arur, PhD, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center: For discovery of Dicer1 phosphorylation by RAS/ERK signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans and implications for human fertility and cancer metastasis
  • Stephen B. Baylin, MD, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine: For seminal research supporting the concept that epigenetically mediated loss-of-gene function is a major player in the progression of cancer
  • Rohit Bhargava, PhD, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign: For pioneering contributions to chemical imaging, including infrared spectroscopic imaging theory, development of instrumentation, and its applications to realize all-digital cancer pathology
  • George A. Calin, MD, PhD, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center: For his landmark discovery linking human diseases and miRNAs, specifically downregulation of miRNAs in patients with leukemias; pioneered the concept of microRNAs involvement in neurogenesis
  • Shi-Yuan Cheng, PhD, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine: For outstanding contributions in molecular and translational cancer research, by developing and exploiting cellular and preclinical models for human tumor biology and therapy
  • Deborah J. Donnell, PhD, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center: For distinguished contributions to the field of HIV prevention research, particularly for design and analysis of clinical trials of pre-exposure prophylaxis and treatment as prevention
  • Christopher Francklyn, PhD, University of Vermont: For paradigm-shifting discoveries that link control of protein synthesis with biologic mechanisms and regulatory compromises in cancer, blindness, and deafness
  • Lyn H. Jones, PhD, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute: For distinguished contributions to the field of medicinal chemistry, particularly using chemical biology to advance drug discovery research
  • Jason S. Lewis, PhD, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center: For his ground-breaking work in molecular imaging and radiochemistry and on the clinical translation of novel oncologic imaging agents
  • Han Liang, PhD, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center: For his pioneering integrative analysis of cancer genomic data and development of related bioinformatic tools to improve delivery of precision cancer medicine
  • Jeffrey D. Lifson, PhD, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research: For distinguished contributions to innovative scientific and collaborative support of AIDS research, sustained quality mentorship, and scientific community service over multiple decades
  • Faina Linkov, PhD, MPH, Duquesne University: For services to biobehavioral cancer research and for improving publishing opportunities to scientists in the developing world
  • Sendurai Mani, PhD, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center: For demonstrating that cancer can make its own cancer stem cells and promote plasticity, resulting in metastasis and chemoresistance by activating latent embryonic epithelial-mesenchymal transition
  • Matthew Meyerson, MD, PhD, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Harvard Medical School: For distinguished contributions and pioneering genomic discoveries in cancer biology
  • Susan L. Mooberry, PhD, TheUniversity of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio: For distinguished contributions to the field of cancer pharmacology, particularly on discovery and development of natural product antimicrotubule agents for the treatment of cancer
  • Nicholas E. Navin, PhD, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center: For seminal contributions to understanding clonal evolution in breast cancer and inventing the first single-cell DNA sequencing methods, establishing the field of single-cell genomics
  • Hiroyoshi Nishikawa, MD, PhD, National Cancer Center/Nagoya University (Japan): For distinguished contributions to the field of tumor immunology and immunotherapy, particularly for basic understanding of regulatory T cells in animal models and patients with cancer
  • Daniel Raftery, PhD, University of Washington: For distinguished contributions to the fields of metabolomics and nuclear magnetic resonance, especially for advanced analytic methods with applications in biomarker discovery and cancer diagnosis
  • W. Kimryn Rathmell, MD, PhD, Vanderbilt University Medical Center: For distinguished contributions elucidating molecular mechanisms and translational approaches in renal and other hypoxia-driven cancers
  • Daniel Schaid, PhD, Mayo Clinic: For distinguished contributions to human statistical genetics and the genetics of prostate cancer and other common diseases and traits
  • Clare Yu, PhD, University of California, Irvine: For her contributions across condensed matter and biologic physics, with special emphasis on disordered systems, intracellular transport, the physics of cancer, and quantum computing
  • Lee Zou, PhD, Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center/Harvard Medical School: For distinguished contributions to the fields of biochemistry and cancer, particularly for studies on the maintenance of genome stability. 


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