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J. Evan Sadler, MD, PhD, Expert in Blood-Clotting Disorders, Dies at 67


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J. Evan Sadler, MD, PhD

J. Evan Sadler, MD, PhD

Pioneering hematologist J. Evan Sadler, MD, PhD, an expert in the study and treatment of blood-clotting disorders, died December 13, 2018, at his home in Clayton, Missouri, following a brief illness. He was 67. Dr. Sadler was the Director of Hematology, the Ira M. Lang Professor of Medicine, and a Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Work Critical to von Willebrand, ADAMTS13 Proteins

Dr. Sadler, who had served on the Washington University faculty for 34 years, pioneered the study of several blood coagulation factors. In particular, his contributions have been critical to the molecular, genetic, and biochemical characterization of von Willebrand factor and ADAMTS13, two proteins associated with bleeding and clotting disorders.

His laboratory identified the molecular basis for a range of subtypes of von Willebrand disease, which has led to improved diagnosis and therapy. In addition, his complementary studies of the structure and function of ADAMTS13 have important implications for understanding the pathophysiology of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. The molecular understanding of these diseases enabled Dr. Sadler to lead efforts to develop existing clinical guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of von Willebrand disease and thrombocytopenic purpura.

Dr. Sadler received numerous awards and honors recognizing his outstanding contributions to the field of hematology. He was especially known for his pioneering research and his dedication to mentorship. His outstanding contributions to hematology over his entire career were recognized when he received the American Society of Hematology’s Henry M. Stratton Medal for Basic Science in 2016 and the Society’s William Dameshek Prize in 1998. 


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