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City of Hope Announces New Radiation Oncology Chair


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City of Hope recently announced the appointment of Terence M. Williams, MD, PhD, as Professor and Chair of its Department of Radiation Oncology. Dr. Williams takes the helm of one of the largest and most experienced radiation oncology services in the country, with more than 15 locations and 42 physicians.

Dr. Williams’ leadership experience, coupled with his notable research achievements, will accelerate scientific discoveries and clinical care delivery at City of Hope. He will expand clinical and basic science research in the department by leveraging existing institutional strengths and optimize City of Hope’s extensive network by facilitating multidisciplinary collaborations. He will also integrate and expand novel treatment therapies, provide professional development and advancement opportunities for radiation oncology physicians, expand the Radiation Oncology residency program, and continue to build on the department’s financial performance.

Terence M. Williams, MD, PhD

Terence M. Williams, MD, PhD

Previous Experience

Prior to joining City of Hope, Dr. Williams held several leadership roles at The James Cancer Hospital and Comprehensive Cancer Center at The Ohio State University. Most recently, he served as Vice Chair of Translational Research, Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology, and Division Director of the Thoracic and Hepatopancreaticobiliary clinical programs. He contributed significantly to recruitment as well as to growing the department’s research and clinical missions, resulting in the institution’s being ranked nationally in the top 10 by National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding.

A radiation oncologist, Dr. Williams specializes in treating patients with thoracic and gastrointestinal cancers, with a particular emphasis on non–small cell lung cancer, pancreatic cancer, and hepatobiliary malignancies. His laboratory-based, NIH-funded research focuses on DNA damage response pathways, DNA repair and novel mechanisms of sensitization to radiation and other genotoxic therapies, and nutrient scavenging through caveolae-mediated endocytosis.

Dr. Williams received his MD and PhD from Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York and completed his residency in radiation oncology and an internship in internal medicine at the University of Michigan Medical Center. 

 


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