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WCLC 2018: Smoking Cessation Services Widely Accepted During Lung Cancer Screening

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Key Points

  • Of total current smokers, regardless of eligibility for screening, 83% accepted a referral to smoking cessation services.
  • Of screen-eligible current smokers, 89% accepted hospital-based cessation counseling, and 88% of those who had a baseline low-dose computed tomography in the reporting period attended a hospital-based counseling session.
  • A total of 93% of survey respondents reported being satisfied with the smoking cessation counseling they received.

A recent study found that smoking cessation services offered at the time of lung cancer screening had a high acceptance rate by current smokers. William Evans, MD, FRCPC, Professor Emeritus, McMaster University Department of Oncology, and clinical advisor, Smoking Cessation, Cancer Care Ontario, presented these findings at the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer 19th World Conference on Lung Cancer (Abstract OA09.02).

Acceptance of Cessation Services

The study, conducted by Cancer Care Ontario, offered smoking cessation services to current smokers who visited any of the three program pilot sites in Ontario. Patients who were eligible for lung cancer screening were scheduled for smoking cessation counseling during their baseline low-dose computed tomography (CT) appointment using an opt-out approach. Hospital-based smoking cessation services were provided by trained counselors and consisted of behavioral counseling, a recommendation or prescription for pharmacotherapy, and arrangements for proactive follow-up.

Of 1,241 individuals assessed for eligibility, 808 were eligible for screening, and 63% were identified as current smokers. Of the total current smokers, regardless of eligibility for screening, 83% accepted a referral to smoking cessation services. Of screen-eligible current smokers, 89% accepted hospital-based cessation counseling, and 88% of those who had a baseline low-dose CT in the reporting period attended a hospital-based counseling session. A total of 93% of survey respondents reported being satisfied with the smoking cessation counseling they received.

“It is important to seize the opportunity to discuss smoking cessation with those attending a screening program,” said Dr. Evans. “The motivation of the individuals coming in for screening, combined with the approaches taken by the nurse navigator, has made the program successful. By taking an empathetic approach, we’ve been able to help current smokers get the resources they need....”

The content in this post has not been reviewed by the American Society of Clinical Oncology, Inc. (ASCO®) and does not necessarily reflect the ideas and opinions of ASCO®.


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