IASLC 2017: Exercise Interventions in Advanced Lung Cancer Patients Led to Increased Functionality

Key Points

  • The control group received standard care, while the intervention group underwent a 12-week physical and psychosocial intervention, which included cardiovascular and strength training.
  • The exercise group was found to have improved functional capacity at the conclusion of the intervention, although there was no group difference in these measures.
  • The control group experienced no change in quality of life, whereas the intervention group reported a significant improvement in quality of life, which may be linked to the improved functionality.

Physical exercise and psychosocial interventions in patients with advanced-stage lung cancer improved functional capacity, which may be linked to quality-of-life benefits. Morten Quist, PT, PhD, MSc, of the University of Copenhagen, presented these findings at the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) 18th World Conference on Lung Cancer in Yokohama, Japan.

Dr. Quist and his team recognized the importance of identifying key issues for advanced lung cancer patients in assessing their quality of life. Previous studies have shown that these patients experience a decline in functional capacity after they are diagnosed and during treatment. While many medical professionals believe relaxing and resting is the best intervention for advanced lung cancer patients, the researchers set out to determine if exercise interventions would lead to increased functional capacity, along with improved quality of life.

Study Findings

The researchers randomized 218 eligible adult patients with advanced-stage lung cancer who were undergoing chemotherapy into two study groups. The control group received standard care, whereas the intervention group underwent a 12-week physical and psychosocial intervention, which included cardiovascular and strength training. Aerobic capacity, functional capacity, and quality of life were measured at baseline and at 12 weeks.

The exercise group was found to have improved functional capacity at the conclusion of the intervention, although there was no group difference in these measures. Additionally, the control group experienced no change in quality of life, whereas the intervention group reported a significant improvement in quality of life, which may be linked to the improved functionality.

“Improving or maintaining functional capacity means being able to take on activities of daily living and not burdening caregivers, which is what the majority of patients fear,” said Dr. Quist. “In this way, being as active as possible for as long as possible can reduce the potential burden and help patients experience a better quality of life.”

The content in this post has not been reviewed by the American Society of Clinical Oncology, Inc. (ASCO®) and does not necessarily reflect the ideas and opinions of ASCO®.


Advertisement

Advertisement



Advertisement